Jesse Casbon in the News

Of Thomas Casbon’s (1803–1888) three sons, I know the least about Jesse. He was born at Meldreth, or possibly Melbourn, Cambridgeshire, in 1843.[1] He came to the United States (via Quebec) aboard the ship Parkfield in 1846. Jesse served in Company D, 148th Ohio Regiment, during the American Civil War and afterwards joined his family… Continue reading Jesse Casbon in the News

The Casbon Family Reunion, October 1901, Valparaiso, Indiana

Casbon family reunion 24 October 1901; author’s collection (Please! Click on image to enlarge and see names) I’ve had this photograph for so long that I don’t remember where or who it came from. I believe I was given a copy sometime in the 1990s when I was just starting my genealogy research. Many of… Continue reading The Casbon Family Reunion, October 1901, Valparaiso, Indiana

Herman, Floyd, and Harriet, about 1905

I must start this post with an apology. I’m not sure who sent me the photograph of Herman, Floyd and Harriet Casbon. I believe it was one of my Iowa Casbon cousins. I’m sorry for not giving you proper credit! Left to right: Herman, Harriet, and Floyd Casbon, ca. 1905, probably taken at Valparaiso, Indiana… Continue reading Herman, Floyd, and Harriet, about 1905

Four Men—a Postcard

Do you like postcards? I must admit that I haven’t sent one in decades—even before the days of email and social media. And I can’t recall the last time I received one, either. Here’s a postcard that was never mailed. “From right to left: Uncle Lawrence, Mr Williams, Father, Uncle Charley”; courtesy of Claudia Vokoun… Continue reading Four Men—a Postcard

Aylesworth Connections

The Aylesworth name is well-known to many of the Casbons who trace their roots through Porter County, Indiana. One reason for this is that Carrie Belle Aylesworth (1873–1958) was the wife of Amos Casbon (1869–1956). Their wedding took place on 28 November 1900 at the home of Carrie’s parents (see “Wedding Bells”) in Boone Township.… Continue reading Aylesworth Connections

Color!

At this moment, most if not all of my readers are practicing some form of “social distancing” because of the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic. I hope you are all staying well and coping with the difficulties associated with this historic situation. With today’s post, I have a suggestion that will hopefully lift your spirits and alleviate… Continue reading Color!

“Short a hand”

This is my 10th post for the Guild of One-Name Studies blog challenge 2020. The challenge was to write ten blog posts in the first twelve weeks of the year. Today’s post features two newspaper articles about an unfortunate incident that occurred in 1889 in rural Porter County, Indiana. The boy who lost his hand was… Continue reading “Short a hand”

Sunday School

This is my eighth post in the Guild of One-Name Studies blog challenge 2020. Many genealogy researchers have learned that old books can be a valuable source of information about their ancestors. Many books that are no longer protected by copyright have been digitized and are available online. The three book sources that I use… Continue reading Sunday School

“Wedding Bells”

This is my seventh post in the Guild of One-Name Studies blog challenge. My last post was about the period in Amos Casbon’s life before his marriage. Today we read about his wedding to Carrie Belle Aylesworth on 28 November 1900. This is another newspaper discovery from my visit to the Valparaiso (Porter County, Indiana)… Continue reading “Wedding Bells”

Grandpa’s Reader

This was my grandfather Leslie Casbon’s (1894–1990) Third Reader. I know it was his book, because he wrote his name inside the front cover. It must also have been used by his brother, Lynnet (1899–1983), whose name is written inside the back cover. Since Leslie was the oldest child of Lawrence (1865–1950) and Kate (Marquart, 1868–1959)… Continue reading Grandpa’s Reader