Children of Thomas Casbon (1803–1888): Emma

Emma Elizabeth Casbon was the last child born to Thomas and Emma (Scruby) Casbon, and the only one born in the United States. Her life is poorly documented. Reporting of births was not required in Ohio until the 1850s, so there is no official record of her birth. The birth date carved into her grave… Continue reading Children of Thomas Casbon (1803–1888): Emma

Children of Thomas Casbon (1803–1888): Jesse

Jesse Casbon was the fourth surviving child of Thomas and Emma (Scruby, 1811–1870) Casbon, and the last one born before their departure for America. Jesse was born November 23, 1843 and baptized May 26, 1844 in Meldreth.[1],[2] Jesse would have been less than 3 years old when the family boarded the Parkfield, bound for America,… Continue reading Children of Thomas Casbon (1803–1888): Jesse

Children of Thomas Casbon (1803–1888): Charles Thomas

Charles Thomas Casbon was the third surviving child and second surviving son of Thomas and and Emma (Scruby) Casbon. He is the first Casbon family member in my records to bear the name Charles. Like his brother Sylvester, his life is relatively well documented, thanks both to his long life and his biography, published in… Continue reading Children of Thomas Casbon (1803–1888): Charles Thomas

Children of Thomas Casbon (1803–1888): Sylvester V

After the birth of Mary Ann Casbon in 1833, Thomas and Emma (Scruby) Casbon named their second child, a son, “Sell.” He was born about August, 1835, baptized July 1st, 1836, and buried July 24, 1836 at the age of 11 months. [1],[2] Their third child was also a son, and as was common at… Continue reading Children of Thomas Casbon (1803–1888): Sylvester V

Children of Thomas Casbon (1803–1888): Mary Anne

My third great grandfather Thomas Casbon and his wife Emma (Scruby) had five children who survived into adulthood. Four were born in England and the fifth was born in Ohio, less than a year after their arrival in the United States. Their oldest child was Mary Ann, born in about 1833. What did thirteen-year old… Continue reading Children of Thomas Casbon (1803–1888): Mary Anne

James Casbon in the 1880 U.S. Census, Porter Township, Porter County, Indiana

James Casbon (abt. 1813—1884) was the subject of an earlier post. He is the common ancestor to many Casbon descendants, both in the United States and United Kingdom. Because of his relatively short time in America, there are few records about his life here. He only appears in one U.S. Census, that of 1880, since… Continue reading James Casbon in the 1880 U.S. Census, Porter Township, Porter County, Indiana

From England to Indiana, Part 8

This the eighth and final post concerning a handwritten family history of Isaac Casbon, his son Thomas, and Thomas’ descendants. The final section of the document introduces three new characters to the story. (Click on image to enlarge) Mary Payne & Rachell or Emma Payne came to America & They were the daughters of Sarah… Continue reading From England to Indiana, Part 8

From England to Indiana, Part 7

This the seventh in a series of posts reviewing a handwritten family history of Isaac Casbon and his son Thomas. I’ve been dividing it into ‘bite-sized’ chunks to keep from overwhelming myself and my readers. This post will cover Emma Scruby’s (wife of Thomas) brother James and his descendents. (Click on image to enlarge) James… Continue reading From England to Indiana, Part 7

From England to Indiana, Part 6

This the sixth post describing the handwritten family history of Isaac Casbon and his son Thomas. Thomas is my third great grandfather. This section looks at Emma Scruby’s (Thomas’ wife) immediate family. (Click on image to enlarge) Record of Emma Scruby her father was Sylvester Scruby his father’s name was Joseph Scruby Syveste Scruby scruby… Continue reading From England to Indiana, Part 6

Why Indiana?

In a previous post I asked why Thomas Casbon left Ohio for Indiana. It seems that he was making a good go of things in Ohio. He owned his own farm. He raised his children to adulthood there. We’ll probably never know exactly why he decided to move, but it’s likely there was more than one… Continue reading Why Indiana?