Forebears: Cambridgeshire

My last post began an exploration into the early English origins of Our Casbon Journey. I presented data from parish (church) records from 1560 through 1699, showing where baptisms fitting a particular spelling pattern were reported throughout England. Baptisms in Cambridgeshire were recorded earlier and far outnumbered those of any other county. This post will examine Cambridgeshire baptisms in more detail.

Let me begin by explaining a little bit about England’s counties and parishes. Counties can be defined in several ways, but for the purposes of this discussion, they are considered historic administrative and geographic divisions that date back many centuries. The word shire is an older term for county and we frequently see it used as a suffix in the formal names of many English counties. Thus, Cambridgeshire means Cambridge County.

The historic counties of England; Cambridgeshire is highlighted in yellow; this image made use of data provided by the Historic County Borders Project (http://www.county-borders.co.uk) (Click on image to enlarge)

Parishes were the basic geographic and administrative unit of the Church of England (and the Roman Catholic church before that). Parishes were associated with individual towns or villages, except in cities, where there could be multiple parishes. Parishes carried out both religious and basic governmental functions within their boundaries. They were responsible for tasks such as law enforcement, maintenance of roads and highways, and relief of the poor. In the nineteenth century, civil parishes were created to take over the secular responsibilities previously carried out by the ecclesiastical, or church-related, parishes. Both types of parish coexist today.

In 1538, during the time of Henry VIII, parishes were required for the first time to record every baptism, marriage, and burial that occurred within their boundaries. Before this, there had been no universal or systematic method for recording vital events. The earliest records were kept on paper and many of them have been lost. In 1558, Queen Elizabeth ordered that the records be written on parchment. These were more durable and more of these have survived. During the time of the English Civil War and Commonwealth, 1642–1660, many records were lost or destroyed. These gaps often make it difficult to trace family connections beyond the mid-to-late seventeenth century.

In Cambridgeshire, most parish records are available online, either as transcriptions or actual digital images (copied from microfilm). I have tried to find and save a copy of every record with the Casb___ spelling pattern that is available. As mentioned in the previous post, I found records of 255 baptisms that occurred in Cambridgeshire between 1560 and 1699. Let’s look at these in further detail.

The following map and table show the parishes where these baptisms are recorded. In addition to the name of the parish, the number of baptisms (in parentheses), earliest year of baptism, and predominant spelling(s) of the surname are provided.

Interactive Google map showing the parishes in Cambridgeshire where Casb___ baptisms are recorded. The red outline is the approximate county border during the 16th and 17th centuries. Click on a marker to see more details. See below for descriptions of color coding and different markers

Parish (# of baptisms)Earliest baptismPredominant Surname(s)
Babraham (2)1595Casbolt(e)
Balsham (1)1691Casbout
Barrington (4)1682Casbolt
Bartlow (1)1699Casebolt
Bottisham (4)1672Casbone
Burwell (52)1565Casburn, Caseb(o)urn(e), Cawsb(o)urn(e)
Cambridge (6)1613Casboll, Casbone, Casbolt
Ely (8)1622Casborn, Cas(e)bo(u)rn(e)
Fowlmere (21)1582Casbolt(e), Casbourne
Fulbourn (3)1661Casbon
Grantchester (2)1584Cas(e)bowle
Great Abington (4)1685Cas(e)bolt
Hildersham (6)1571Casbolt
Isleham (23)1567Cas(e)born(e)
Linton (57)1560Casbo(u)lt(e)
Little Wilbraham (4)1673Causbone
Littleport (3)1686Cas(e)bo(u)rne
Melbourn (34)1578Casbold(e), Cas(t)bolt, Catsbold
Orwell (1)1580Casbold
Stow cum Quy (2)1696Cazborn, Caseburn
Stuntney (1)1653Casborne
Thriplow (15)1575Cas(e)bo(u)lt
Wendy cum Shingay (1)1563Casbolde
A table showing parish (# of baptisms), year of earliest baptism, and predominant surnames

While summarizing this data, I noticed that there are regional differences in how the surname is spelled, and identified four distinct areas. The names always begin with the same Cas(e)b– pattern, but the ending is different in each area. These areas are depicted by the four marker colors on the map.

I’ve selected an “epicenter” for each area. This is the parish where the greatest number of—and usually the earliest—baptisms were recorded. The epicenters are represented on the map by the markers with stars.

Here are the four patterns and areas:

  • rn(e) ending: Casborn, Casbourn, Casborne, Casbourne, Casburn, etc. These are the predominant spellings in the parishes indicated by black markers. The parishes are: Burwell, Ely, Isleham, Littleport, Stow cum Quy, and Stuntney. All are located north of Cambridge city. Both the greatest numbers and earliest records of baptisms in this area come from Burwell, the epicenter. Burwell is unique in that Cas(e)b– is usually followed by urn or urne as opposed to orn(e) or ourn(e) in the rest of this area. The –urn spelling is still associated with Burwell today. There is even a Casburn Lane in Burwell!
Number 1, Casburn Lane, in Burwell; Google Street View image
  • lt(e) ending: Casbolt, Casboult, Casbolte, Casboulte, etc. These parishes are represented by the blue markers and are found in the southern and southeastern parts of the county. They are: Babraham, Balsham, Barrington, Bartlow, Fowlmere, Great Abington, Hildersham, Linton, and Thriplow. Linton is the epicenter, with both the most (57) and earliest (1560) baptisms. The Casbolt spelling is most often seen today.
  • ld(e) ending: Casbold(e) and Catsbold; represented by grey markers, the parishes are Melbourn, Orwell, and Wendy cum Shingay in southwestern Cambridgeshire. Although the earliest record is found in Wendy (1563), many more records (34) are found in Melbourn, so I have marked that parish as the epicenter. Surnames ending in –olt are also common in Melbourn. Melbourne is adjacent to the –olt area, so it’s not surprising that there should be overlap between the areas. Linguistically, –ld is much closer to –lt than either one is to –rn, so perhaps the surname in these two areas (-olt and –old) have a common origin.
  • on(e), –owle and –oll endings: Casbon, Casbone, Casbowle, and Casboll. These surnames, indicated by orange markers, occur in Bottisham, Cambridge, Fulbourn, Grantchester, and Little Wilbraham. The parishes are in the near vicinity or a bit east of Cambridge City, which I’ve named as the epicenter. In general the surname came to these parishes later than the other areas, so perhaps the name changed as people migrated. the –n and –l endings seem to be a mix of the northern and southern areas. This area also has the smallest number of baptisms—19 total.

What does all this mean? I can only guess. One possibility is that the surname developed independently in at least two parts of Cambridgeshire—the -rn(e) variant in the north and the -lt(e) and -ld(e) variant in the south. Or maybe there was one point of origin, long before church records came into being, and the spellings and pronunciation changed as descendants migrated to other parishes. I would dearly like to know. It would take a detailed Y-DNA study to find an answer.

Future posts will look focus on individual parishes in Cambridgeshire.

Origins: The Earliest Ancestors from Littleport

Reader be forewarned! This is one of those strict genealogy posts – all names & dates – no interesting stories. I won’t be offended if you decide to pass on this one. With this post, I intend to summarize my research into the origins of what I have called the “Peterborough Casbons”, so named because the family eventually settled in that area, and members of the family remain there today.

In an earlier post (see “How doth your garden grow? Part 1”) I described how Thomas Casborn (~1776–1855) left Littleport, Cambridgeshire, and how his son Thomas (~1807–1863) settled in Peterborough, where he had a gardening business. Working backwards, I traced “1776 Thomas” back one generation to his father Thomas (see “Stepping Back: Thomas Casborn of Littleport (~1732-1780)”). Here is a diagram of the sequence I just described.

3 generations of descendants
3 generations of Casbons, from Littleport & Peterborough (Click on image to enlarge)

Now I’ll start with Thomas (~1732-1780)”) and work my way back. His baptismal record of October 15, 1832 shows that his parents were Thomas and Anne Caseborne.[1]

Detail from LIttleport (Cambridgeshire) parish register, Baptisms, 1732; “Thomas of Thomas & Anne Caseborne _ _ (October) 15” (Click on image to enlarge)

Who were Thomas & Anne? The Bishop’s Transcripts of 1720 show the marriage of Thomas Casebourne and Anne Kendale on October 6th.[2]

Detail from Bishop’s Transcripts, Littleport, Marriages 1820; “Thomas Casebourne & Anne Kendale October 6” (Click on image to enlarge)

Looking further back, there is a baptismal record for Thomas Casborne, son of William & Alice, May 29, 1695.[3] He is the most likely candidate for the Thomas who married Anne Kendale, and father of Thomas (b. ~1832). I have not found a baptismal record for Anne.

Besides Thomas, there are records of six other children born to Thomas and Anne: William (baptized 1721), Elizabeth (1722), Mary (1727), Abraham (1729, died 1734), another Mary (1734), and another Abraham (1739).[4],[5],[6],[7],[8],[9],[10] Anne’s death is recorded in 1750, and Thomas’s in 1751.[11],[12] You can also see that Thomas’s burial record gives his occupation as “Labourer”

Detail from Bishop’s Transcripts, Littleport, burials 1751; “Thomas Casborne, Labourer.—Sept:r 27” Note that his son William’s burial is the next entry, on October 13th (Click on image to enlarge)

Here is a family tree of Thomas and Anne (Kendale) Caseborne, showing their relationship to the Peterborough Casbons.

(Click on image to enlarge)

I’m able to trace this family back one more generation. As mentioned above, Thomas (baptized 1695) was the son of William and Alice. There are baptismal records for three other children born to William and Alice: William (baptized 1687), Alice (1592), and John (1699).[13],[14],[15] There may have been a fourth child, Mary, for whom there is a burial record on the same day as John in 1699, but no baptismal record.[16]

Who were William and Alice? I don’t know. I can’t find a marriage record for them, nor can I find a baptismal record for William. There are no baptisms, marriages or burials with the Casb___ surname recorded in Littleport between 1620 (burial of Robert Casborn, widower) and 1687 (baptism of William – see previous paragraph).[17]

Here is a family tree of William and Alice, the earliest generation I have been able to trace back from the Peterborough Casbons.

Wm d 1699 fam tree

Where did this family come from before William? It’s impossible for me to say. There are Casb(*) records in nearby Ely and Stuntney, but not enough information to make familial connections.

Detail of 1945 Ordnance Survey map showing Littleport and Ely (This work is based on data provided through http://www.VisionofBritain.org.uk and uses historical material which is copyright of the
Great Britain Historical GIS Project and the University of Portsmouth) (Click on image to enlarge)

I’ve said before that there is no evidence that the Peterborough Casbons, hence the Littleport Casborns, are related to my branch, the “Meldreth Casbons.” It’s still fascinating to me that the many variants of our surname are concentrated so heavily in the part of England known as East Anglia. Perhaps there was a common ancestor many generations before, or maybe there was just a common reason for so many people to have the same name (see “a term of reproach …”). Would DNA be able to help sort this out?

[1] LIttleport Parish (Cambridgeshire, England), Bishop’s Transcripts 1599–1832, unnumbered page (image 271) showing baptisms, 1732, Thomas Caseborne, 15 October; browsable images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-892X-HQHF?i=270&cat=976859 : accessed 15 September 2016); citing Family History Library (FHL) microfilm 2,206,070, (unnumbered) item 1.
[2] LIttleport Parish (Cambridgeshire), Bishop’s Transcripts 1599–1832, unnumbered page (image 253) showing marriages, 1720, Thomas Casebourne & Anne Kendale, 6 October.
[3] LIttleport, Bishop’s Transcripts 1599–1832, unnumbered page (image 201), baptisms, 1695, Thomas Caseborn, 7 July.
[4] LIttleport, Bishop’s Transcripts 1599–1832, unnumbered page (image 253), baptisms, 1720/21, William Casebourne, 9 March.
[5] LIttleport Bishop’s Transcripts 1599–1832, unnumbered page (image 256), baptisms, 1722, Elizabeth Casebourne, 16 December.
[6] LIttleport, Bishop’s Transcripts 1599–1832, unnumbered page (image 263), baptisms, 1727, Mary Caseborne, 10 September.
[7] LIttleport, Bishop’s Transcripts 1599–1832, unnumbered page (image 267), baptisms, 1729, Abraham Caseborne, 21 December.
[8] LIttleport, Bishop’s Transcripts 1599–1832, unnumbered page (image 276), burials, 1734, Abraham Caseborne, 3 December.
[9] LIttleport, Bishop’s Transcripts 1599–1832, unnumbered page (image 275), baptisms, 1734, Mary Caseborne, 2 August.
[10] LIttleport, Bishop’s Transcripts 1599–1832, unnumbered page (image 281), baptisms, 1738/39, Abraham Caseborne, 14 February.
[11] LIttleport, Bishop’s Transcripts 1599–1832, unnumbered page (image 305), burials, 1750, Ann Casborne, 20 May.
[12] LIttleport, Bishop’s Transcripts 1599–1832, unnumbered page (image 307), burials, 1751, Thomas Casborne, 27 September.
[13] LIttleport, Bishop’s Transcripts 1599–1832, unnumbered page (image 194), baptisms, 1687, William Casborne, 4 November.
[14] LIttleport, Bishop’s Transcripts 1599–1832, unnumbered page (image 199), baptisms, 1692, Alice Casborne, 26 March.
[15] LIttleport, Bishop’s Transcripts 1599–1832, unnumbered page (image 213), baptisms, 1699, John Casebourne, 14 May.
[16] LIttleport, Bishop’s Transcripts 1599–1832, unnumbered page (image 213), burials, 1699, Mary Casebourne, 20 August.
[17] LIttleport, Bishop’s Transcripts 1599–1832, unnumbered page (image 47), burials, 1619/20, Robert Casborne, 29 February.

A Family of Tailors

We’ve already met Alfred Hitch Casbon. He’s the guy whose middle name was transcribed as “Jitel” (see “Without a Hitch”). He was the son of James (Howse) Casbon (1806–1871) by his first wife, Ann Hitch.

Alfred Hitch Casbon was born September 4, 1828 in Melbourn, Cambridgeshire and baptized in the “non-conformist” Independent church December 7th of the same year.[1] He spent his early years in Meldreth with his family. By 1851, however, “Hitch” was working as a tailor, and living in the town of Sandiacre, Derbyshire, England.[2]

Detail from 1851 census, Sandiacre, Derbyshire, England (Click on image to enlarge)

For reasons unknown, he decided to be baptized again as an adult into the Church of England, in 1851.[3] Perhaps this had something to do with his upcoming marriage. He married Charlotte (Haines) Hornby, a widow, on August 9, 1852.[4]

Marriage record of Alfred Hitch Casbon and Charlotte Hornby, August 9, 1852 (Click on image to enlarge)

Alfred and Charlotte had a son, also named Alfred Hitch, in 1853.[5] Charlotte died in 1866,[6] and Alfred remarried in 1867, this time to Elizabeth Ryder, a previously unmarried woman.[7] Their first child, Arthur Hitch, born in 1868, lived only a matter of days.[8] Their second son was born in 1870 and named Harry Hitch Casbon.[9] Thus, Alfred Hitch Casbon had two surviving sons, born 17 years apart.

Alfred moved around quite a bit during his working years. His first marriage was in Hackney (London).[10] Arthur was baptized and buried in Haddenham (near Ely).[11] Harry was baptized in Ely proper.[12] By 1861 Alfred was again living in Hackney and in 1871 he was in Kent.[13], [14]

By 1881 he finally settled down for good, in Bury, Lancashire. The census of that year is the only one that shows Alfred, his wife, and both surviving sons together.[15]

Page from 1881 Census, Bury, Lancashire, England (Click on image to enlarge)

By this point, Alfred senior seems to have attained some stability in his occupation. He employed an apprentice and machinist. Alfred junior had also learned the tailor’s trade. Alfred senior died at Bury in 1887.[16] His widow Elizabeth died in 1904.[17]

Meanwhile, Alfred junior was married in 1885 to Margaret Marshall, the daughter of a baker.[18] In the 1891 census, Alfred and Margaret were listed in separate locations, Alfred as a lodger in Brighton, Sussex, and Margaret as head of household in Bury.[19], [20] Perhaps this was due to a temporary work situation for Alfred, as they were together again in Bury for the 1901 census.[21] Alfred and Helen had two daughters, Helen and Laura, born 1887 and 1888, respectively.[22], [23]

In the 1911 census, Alfred described his specialty as “gentlemens tailoring.”[24]

Schedule from 1911 Census, Bury, Lancashire, England.(Click on image to enlarge)

This census also shows that daughter Helen was employed as a milliner and Laura as an elementary school teacher. This census image is also interesting because it shows the actual form completed by Alfred and provided to the census enumerator. Prior to 1911 these forms, known as schedules, have been lost, and only the summary sheets completed by the census enumerators survive. Alfred’s wife Margaret died 1934 in Bury, and Alfred died one year later, also in Bury.[25], [26]

By 1891, Harry Hitch, the youngest son, was also a tailor.[27] He married Elizabeth Bradshaw in 1897.[28] In the 1891 and 1901 censuses, Harry was living in Radcliffe, Lancashire, not far from Bury.[29] In 1911 he was living in Bury again.[30]

Detail from 1911 Census, Bury, Lancashire, England (Click on image to enlarge)

Unlike their father, both Alfred junior and Harry were listed as “workers”—not employers—on the census forms. In the 1939 register (similar to a census – taken just after the outbreak of war), Harry is listed as a Journeyman Tailor – retired.[31] The word journeyman implies that he could serve as an employee, but had not fulfilled all the requirements to be a master tailor and hence could not be self-employed. Harry and Elizabeth never had children. Harry died 1943 in Fylde, Lancashire, and Helen died 1956 in Blackpool, Lancashire.[32], [33]

Here’s a chart showing how the “Hitch’s” are descended from the Meldreth Casbon branch.

(Click on image to enlarge)

[1] “England & Wales Non-Conformist Births and Baptisms”, Hitch Casbon (born 4 Sep 1828, baptized 7 December 1828); images and transcriptions, findmypast (http://search.findmypast.com/record?id=tna%2frg4%2fbap%2f183809 : accessed 10 Jan 2017); citing The National Archives, TNA/RG/4/155.
[2] “1851 Census of England, Wales & Scotland,” image and transcription, findmypast (http://search.findmypast.com/record?id=gbc%2f1851%2f0013258922 : accessed 8 March 2017), entry for Hitch Casbourn (age 22) in household of William Raynor,Sandiacre, Shardlow, Derbyshire,  ; citing [The National Archives], HO 107, piece 2141, folio 241, p. 241 (stamped).
[3] Meldreth Parish (Cambridgeshire, England), Parish registers for Meldreth, 1681-1877, Alfred Hitch Casbon baptism, 25 Oct 1851; FHL microfilm 1,040,542.
[4] “London, England, Church of England Marriages and Banns, 1754-1921,” Alfred Hitch Casbon & Charlotte Hornby, 9 August 1852; images and transcriptions, Ancestry (www.ancestry.com : accessed 10 August 2016); citing London Metropolitan Archives, London.
[5] “England & Wales births 1837-2006,” Alfred Hitch Casbon; database, findmypast (http://search.findmypast.com/record?id=bmd%2fb%2f1853%2f2%2fah%2f000619%2f035 : accessed 8 March 2017); citing Hackney, London, England, 2d quarter, 1853, vol. 1B: 263.
[6] “London, England, Church of England Deaths and Burials, 1813-1980,” Parish of West Hackney, Middlesex, England; transcriptions and images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 17 February 2017), entry for Charlotte Casbon, buried 13 November 1866; citing Board of Guardian Records, 1834-1906 and Church of England Parish Registers, 1813-1906. London Metropolitan Archives, London.
[7] “London, England, Church of England Marriages and Banns, 1754-1921,” Alfred Hitch Casbon & Elizabeth Ryder, 15 April 1867; Ancestry (accessed 10 August 2016).
[8] Cambridge Family History Society, “Cambridgeshire Burials,” transcripts, findmypast (http://search.findmypast.com/record?id=gbprs%2fd%2f403340357%2f1 : accessed 8 March 2017), entry for Arthur Hitch Casbon, 17 Aug 1868, Haddenham, Cambridgeshire, England.
[9] Cambridge Family History Society, “Cambridgeshire Baptisms,” transcripts, findmypast (http://search.findmypast.com/record?id=gbprs%2fb%2f323517931%2f1 : accessed 31 Jan 2017), entry for Harry Hitch Casbon, born 25 May 1870, baptized 21 Jun 1870, Ely (Cambridgeshire), Wesleyan Methodist [Church].
[10]  “London, England, Church of England Marriages and Banns, 1754-1921,” Casbon & Hornby, 9 August 1852.
[11] Cambridge Family History Society, “Cambridgeshire Burials,” Arthur Hitch Casbon, 17 Aug 1868.
[12] Cambridge Family History Society, “Cambridgeshire Baptisms,” Harry Hitch Casbon, born 25 May 1870.
[13] “1861 Census of England and Wales,” image and transcriptions, findmypast (http://search.findmypast.com/record?id=gbc%2f1861%2f0000993933 : accessed 26 Jan 2017), entry for Alfred Cashon (age 32), Marys Place, Hackney, London; citing [The National Archives], RG 09, piece 155, folio 155, p. 63.
[14] “1871 Census of England, Wales & Scotland,” image and transcriptions, findmypast (http://search.findmypast.com/record?id=gbc%2f1871%2f0014306938 : accessed 8 March 2017), entry for Alfred W Casban, Alexandria Road, St Lawrence, Thanet, Kent; citing [The National Archives], RG 10, piece 997, folio 70, p. 18.
[15] “1881 Census of England, Wales & Scotland,” image and transcriptions, findmypast (http://search.findmypast.com/record?id=gbc%2f1881%2f0017803564 : accessed 8 March 2017), entry for Alfred K Casbon (age 52), Regent Street, Bury, Lancashire; citing [The National Archives], RG 11, piece 2864, folio 96, p. 22.
[16] “England & Wales Deaths 1837-2007,” Bury, Lancashire, England, vol. 8C, p. 404; database, findmypast  (http://search.findmypast.com/record?id=bmd%2fd%2f1887%2f4%2faz%2f000060%2f108 : accessed 8 March 2017), entry for Alfred Hitch Casbon (age 59), 4th quarter, 1887.
[17] “England & Wales Deaths 1837-2007,” Preston, Lancashire, England, vol. 8E: 363; findmypast (http://search.findmypast.com/record?id=bmd%2fd%2f1904%2f3%2faz%2f000060%2f351 : accessed 14 March 2017), entry for Elizabeth Casbon (age 75), 3d quarter, 1904.
[18] Parish of St Thomas Bradford, Yorkshire, England, Alfred Hitch Casbon & Margaret Marshall, 18 October 1885; transcripts and images, “West Yorkshire, England, Church of England Marriages and Banns, 1813-1935,” Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 17 February 2017); citing Yorkshire Parish Records, West Yorkshire Archive Service, Wakefield, Yorkshire.
[19] “1891 Census of England Wales & Scotland,”  image and transcription, findmypast (http://search.findmypast.com/record?id=gbc%2f1891%2f0006364915 : accessed 8 March 2017), entry for entry for Alfred H Casbon (age 37) in household of George Luste[?se], Belgrave Street, Brighton, Sussex, England; citing [The National Archives], R 12, piece 806, folio 71, p. 31.
[20]  “1891 Census of England Wales & Scotland,” image and transcription, findmypast (http://search.findmypast.com/record?id=gbc%2f1891%2f0021545025 : accessed 8 March 2017), entry for Margaret Casbon (age 41), East Street, Bury, Lancashire, England; citing [The National Archives], RG 34, piece 3136, folio 50, p. 34.
[21] “1901 Census of England, Wales & Scotland,” image and transcription, findmypast  (http://search.findmypast.com/record?id=gbc%2f1901%2f0024703844 : accessed 8 March 2017), entry for Alfred H Cashon (age 47), East Street, Bury, Lancashire, England; citing [The National Archives], RG 13, piece 3645, folio 120, p. 33.
[22] “England & Wales births 1837-2006,” Bury, Lancashire, England, vol. 8C: 533; database, findmypast (http://search.findmypast.com/record?id=bmd%2fb%2f1887%2f4%2faz%2f000095%2f116 : accessed 15 March 2017), entry for Helen Marshall Casbon, 4th quarter, 1887.
[23] “England & Wales births 1837-2006,” Bury, Lancashire, England, vol. 8C: 560; database, findmypast (http://search.findmypast.com/record?id=bmd%2fb%2f1888%2f4%2faz%2f000095%2f356 : accessed 15 March 2017), entry for Laura Marshall Casbon, 4th quarter, 1888.
[24] “1911 Census of England and Wales,”  image and transcription, findmypast (http://search.findmypast.com/record?id=gbc%2f1911%2frg14%2f23516%2f0111%2f1 : accessed 8 March 2017), entry for Alf H Casbon (age 57), East St, Bury, Lancashire, England; citing [The National Archives], census reference RG14PN23516 RG78PN1371 RD462 SD5 ED5 SN56.
[25] “England & Wales, National Probate Calendar (Index of Wills and Administrations), 1858-1966,” database and images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 10 August 2016), Casbon, Margaret, 12 July 1934; citing Principal Probate Registry, Calendar of the Grants of Probate and Letters of Administration made in the Probate Registries of the High Court of Justice in England, London.
[26] “England & Wales, National Probate Calendar (Index of Wills and Administrations), 1858-1966,” database and images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 10 August 2016), Casbon, Alfred Hitch, 5 May 1935; citing Principal Probate Registry, Calendar of the Grants of Probate and Letters of Administration made in the Probate Registries of the High Court of Justice in England, London.
[27] “1891 Census of England Wales & Scotland,” image and transcription, findmypast  (http://search.findmypast.com/record?id=gbc%2f1891%2f0021600165 : accessed 8 March 2017), entry for Harry Casbon, West Street, Radcliffe, Bury, Lancashire; citing [The National Archives], RG 12, piece 3143, folio 47, p. 13.
[28] “England & Wales Marriages 1837-2008,” Bury, Lancashire, England, vol. 8c: 882; database, findmypast (http://search.findmypast.com/record?id=bmd%2fm%2f1897%2f3%2faz%2f000060%2f188 : accessed 16 March 2017), entry for Harry Hitch Casbon [& Elizabeth Bradshaw], 3d quarter, 1897.
[29] “1901 Census of England, Wales & Scotland,” image and transcription, findmypast (http://search.findmypast.com/record?id=gbc%2f1901%2f0024729035 : accessed 8 March 2017), entry for Harry H Casbon (age 30), Wellington Street, Radcliffe, Bury, Lancashire, England; citing [The National Archives], RG 13, piece 3648, folio 90, p. 14.
[30] “1911 Census of England and Wales,” image and transcription, findmypast (http://search.findmypast.com/record?id=gbc%2f1911%2frg14%2f23523%2f0577%2f1 : accessed 8 March 2017), entry for Harry Hitch Casbon, Nelson St, Bury, Lancashire;  citing [The National Archives], RG14PN23523 RG78PN1371 RD462 SD5 ED12 SN286.
[31] “1939 Register,” image and transcription, findmypast (http://search.findmypast.com/record?id=TNA%2FR39%2F4258%2F4258A%2F014%2F19 : accessed 8 March 2017), entry for Harry H Casbon (born 25 May 1870), Collyhurst Avenue , Blackpool C.B., Lancashire; citing [The National Archives], RG101/4258A/014/19.
[32] “England & Wales Deaths 1837-2007,” Fylde, Lancashire, vol. 8E: 858; database, findmypast (http://search.findmypast.com/record?id=bmd%2fd%2f1943%2f1%2faz%2f000164%2f105 : accessed 16 March 2017), entry for Harry H Casbon (age 72), 1st quarter, 1943.
[33]  “England & Wales, National Probate Calendar (Index of Wills and Administrations), 1858-1966,” database and images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 17 February 2017), Casbon, Elizabeth, 24 April 1956; citing Principal Probate Registry, Calendar of the Grants of Probate and Letters of Administration made in the Probate Registries of the High Court of Justice in England, London.